The Washington Post recently outlined four possible outcomes of a Brexit, or British exit from the European Union. Barring the assassination of another British politician, campaigning is expected to resume this weekend and a vote is to take place next week on June 23rd. As the initial article states, an exit for Britain will result in further negotiations over its relationship with the EU (as well as non-EU countries), referred to by the author as the “terms of divorce”. Ahhh, parting is such sweet sorrow. A Brexit raises many questions. How will trade function? How will market volatility be affected? How will currencies fluctuate? What will happen with the EU citizens living in Britain and the British citizens living in the EU? How will specific areas currently under the authority of the EU, such as agricultural policies, be impacted? Currently there are no answers or plans, only models to feed off, and none of them paint an ideal future. So, how to hedge a Brexit? In the face of uncertainty and volatility, below are three ways one can attempt to hedge a British exit from the EU. Continue reading

gold pendulumGold is often touted as a must-have investment for the most intense of risk-mitigation situations, a “when all else fails” hedging instrument. Indeed, pick an ailment: Inflation? Hedge with gold. Economic and political crises? Hedge with gold. Collapse of modern society? Say it with me, folks, “Hedge with gold”. With the global economy as shaky as it is, multiple countries in one crisis or another, and plenty of uncertainty as to what the future holds to go around, gold continues to make the rounds as a necessary holding despite the fact that its value in US dollar terms has been steadily declining over the last four years after reaching a peak in 2011 of almost $1,900 an ounce. In the wake of the Fed’s recent decision to stand pat on interest rates and gold’s subsequent jump today, here are 3 reasons to avoid gold, both as a physical or paper holding, apart from a very small percentage of a well-balanced and diversified passive or lazy investment portfolio:

  • It’s a highly emotional and psychological asset
  • There’s no historical evidence that it hedges well against any risk
  • It has very little practical use

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crude oil rigPreviously we reviewed how, historically speaking, gold has proven to be a rather poor hedge against inflation, despite the reality that many continue to promote it for just that purpose. What, then, is a reasonable inflation-hedging investment vehicle? It just so happens that a historically-significant and helpful one is also a commodity – crude oil, the most widely and heavily traded commodity in existence today. Historical data indicates that it functions better than most other proposed hedges out there, especially gold. Continue reading

golden nickelGold is not a good inflation hedge. Yes, it has been touted as one in the past and continues to be touted as one now, but there is little evidence supporting the claim. What’s more, it is rare that any wealth manager or gold bug or supporter of such an idea will tell you why or how it is an effective hedge. It is typically presented as nothing less than a simple statement of fact, a truth everybody should already be familiar and comfortable with. If any reasoning is provided, it might sound something like this – fiat currencies are not backed by anything anymore, unlike before when they were backed by gold. Hence, as central banks the world over pump paper into the system to salvage their ravaged economies, it is inevitable that they will ultimately devaluate their currencies and trigger inflation in the process; they will overdo it, overshoot the mark, mismanage, screw up. People will “wake up” and realize that paper is just paper, that the overzealous “printing” of it has created too much of it chasing too few goods, and they will lose confidence in their central banks and in the currencies they manage. As confidence is lost, so will be value and purchasing power. Furthermore, paper is not like gold, which is a physical thing that has a limited supply (there’s only so much of it that is accessible, anyway), a thing that must be mined, processed, and stored, whereas paper is just…paper. Continue reading

Ranakpur Jain Marble Temple Pillars Frescoes

By Acred99 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

You want to invest, and you figure the way to do it is to (somehow) pick the best stock out there and load up. What’s the best stock out there? Right now, some people will tell you it’s Apple, some people will tell you it’s some small company in the marijuana industry, some people will tell you it’s Berkshire Hathaway, and they’ll all have their reasons why. For the sake of our discussion, it doesn’t really matter what that one stock is, let’s just pretend that you have picked your one stock and you’re going to put your money into that stock because you believe your money will be best put to use there. After all, what’s the point of diversification if you’ve picked the best stock out there? It’ll only dampen your returns, right? Well, besides the reality that you can’t predict the future, there are a host of threats your investment continuously faces. Through diversification, you can hedge your risk of investing in that one equity high-flier. Utilizing broad-based, poorly correlated assets in a well-balanced lazy portfolio minimizes your risk to each individual stock, protecting you from the possibility of an outright loss. And rest assured, there’s an immense amount of risk out there to mitigate. Continue reading

mount-merapi-113620_1280To say that there are some serious headwinds that we as the collective investment community must face these days is putting it lightly. Between financial downturns and outright crises including Japan’s return to recession, Greece’s distaste for austerity, and Russia’s woes with sanctions, collapsing energy prices, and a devastated ruble; the perceived need (not unanimous) for quantitative easing (QE) in Europe eclipsing $1 trillion EUR; stark observations that the world economy is shrinking; and the actions of central banks that catch us on the toilet such as that of Switzerland removing the cap on its currency vis-รก-vis the Euro, there is much to digest. How do you protect and defend your financial positions, your financial worth, your current and future holdings against such startling occurrences and circumstances? How do you protect and defend your financial, and hence personal, goals? You can do so by ensuring that you are passively invested in a well-diversified portfolio of broad-based assets with low intercorrelations, in-line with your true risk profile and investment horizon, and take advantage of the might it affords you. Continue reading

IAI_Heron_1_in_flight_1The latest means being utilized by Mexican drug cartels of getting drugs into the United States appears to be flights by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), commonly known as drones. These aircraft, which we may normally associate with surveillance or deadly military strikes with the often-touted (and disturbing) benefit of little-to-no domestic cost of lives, are reportedly being enhanced, repurposed, or built anew for carrying cocaine and other narcotics across the border for distribution and sale in the US. What’s even more fascinating than the reality that the cartels may be using them at all or how they are acquiring or developing them is how their use highlights traditional business and risk management behavior that you might otherwise expect of a bank or some other legitimized business entity and learn of in an undergraduate business course. Forget about the manufacturing of widgets or whatever other silly made-up product our made-up ACME Corp. is involved in producing as presented in some heavy hardcover textbook. Nah, instead let’s talk about cocaine and the real-life issues of how to get it to market while minimizing risks to the business organization. Here’s how the use of narcodrones highlights the ways in which cartels resemble any old rational corporate entity. Continue reading