The Washington Post recently outlined four possible outcomes of a Brexit, or British exit from the European Union. Barring the assassination of another British politician, campaigning is expected to resume this weekend and a vote is to take place next week on June 23rd. As the initial article states, an exit for Britain will result in further negotiations over its relationship with the EU (as well as non-EU countries), referred to by the author as the “terms of divorce”. Ahhh, parting is such sweet sorrow. A Brexit raises many questions. How will trade function? How will market volatility be affected? How will currencies fluctuate? What will happen with the EU citizens living in Britain and the British citizens living in the EU? How will specific areas currently under the authority of the EU, such as agricultural policies, be impacted? Currently there are no answers or plans, only models to feed off, and none of them paint an ideal future. So, how to hedge a Brexit? In the face of uncertainty and volatility, below are three ways one can attempt to hedge a British exit from the EU. Continue reading

volatility imageThis recent article from the Upshot over at the NY Times attempts to explain why stock markets across the world have been experiencing so much volatility. Surely some of you have noticed and have even heard reports about how the “fear index” is unusually high right now, how the “VIX has jumped”, how “China is slowing”, how “Commodities are plummeting”, how the “Fed might hold on raising rates”, and so on. Basically, if you pay attention to financial news, it’s clear that something’s amiss and volatility is back. Well, to understand the why, we should first review the what. Continue reading

This week marked the five-year anniversary of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act being signed into law. The act is still not complete as parts of it are under review or yet to be written, but it is the biggest piece of consumer protection legislation to be passed since the legislation that was approved following the 1929 crash, including the US Banking Act of 1933 that contained the famous Glass-Steagall provisions. To commemorate this anniversary, Better Markets, a financial watchdog organization, assembled a report that details, among other things, the cost of the 2008 crisis. Continue reading