Ranakpur Jain Marble Temple Pillars Frescoes

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You want to invest, and you figure the way to do it is to (somehow) pick the best stock out there and load up. What’s the best stock out there? Right now, some people will tell you it’s Apple, some people will tell you it’s some small company in the marijuana industry, some people will tell you it’s Berkshire Hathaway, and they’ll all have their reasons why. For the sake of our discussion, it doesn’t really matter what that one stock is, let’s just pretend that you have picked your one stock and you’re going to put your money into that stock because you believe your money will be best put to use there. After all, what’s the point of diversification if you’ve picked the best stock out there? It’ll only dampen your returns, right? Well, besides the reality that you can’t predict the future, there are a host of threats your investment continuously faces. Through diversification, you can hedge your risk of investing in that one equity high-flier. Utilizing broad-based, poorly correlated assets in a well-balanced lazy portfolio minimizes your risk to each individual stock, protecting you from the possibility of an outright loss. And rest assured, there’s an immense amount of risk out there to mitigate. Continue reading

mount-merapi-113620_1280To say that there are some serious headwinds that we as the collective investment community must face these days is putting it lightly. Between financial downturns and outright crises including Japan’s return to recession, Greece’s distaste for austerity, and Russia’s woes with sanctions, collapsing energy prices, and a devastated ruble; the perceived need (not unanimous) for quantitative easing (QE) in Europe eclipsing $1 trillion EUR; stark observations that the world economy is shrinking; and the actions of central banks that catch us on the toilet such as that of Switzerland removing the cap on its currency vis-รก-vis the Euro, there is much to digest. How do you protect and defend your financial positions, your financial worth, your current and future holdings against such startling occurrences and circumstances? How do you protect and defend your financial, and hence personal, goals? You can do so by ensuring that you are passively invested in a well-diversified portfolio of broad-based assets with low intercorrelations, in-line with your true risk profile and investment horizon, and take advantage of the might it affords you. Continue reading

water-balance-280810Having read about how rebalancing can help you enter the financial markets with confidence irregardless of what may be around the corner, you may be wondering as to what is meant by the term in the first place. It’s fairly simple. Ideally, you are invested in a well-balanced portfolio comprised of specific allocations to certain investment vehicles that have low intercorrelations. Over your investment time horizon, you seek to maintain those allocations in order to control risk while striving to achieve your investment objectives given your particular investment profile. Continue reading

man-96868To many, the markets look expensive right now. If you’ve done a thorough job understanding and describing your investment objectives and your capacity to invest and bear risk, and you have money at the ready, you might be sitting on the sidelines wondering what to do right about now, especially as the markets see-saw. How to make a market entry? Do you wait for a big correction before you purchase anything or do you plow forward? It’s natural to feel hesitant. Nobody enjoys buying into something only to see it decrease in value in short order. It’s a sure way to feel like a sucker. Then again, if you wait for the markets to go down and they don’t, you’ve just shot yourself in the foot and missed out on returns. Instead of attempting to predict or time the markets, enter them with confidence and then rebalance your portfolio as necessary to deal with what comes next, including any potential corrections. Continue reading