financial crime fingerprintOn Monday, August 3rd of this year, a single individual was found guilty in London and sentenced to 14 years in prison for profiting off certain fraudulent trades by participating in what many recognize to have been a systemic practice in the banking world of manipulating LIBOR rates. Tom Hayes, a former UBS and Citigroup trader, is more or less the first person to be convicted of financial crime essentially on behalf of the entire financial industry complex worldwide for any criminal activity that the industry has engaged in during this century. The presiding judge, Jeremy Cooke, made no bones about the sentence: “A message needs to be sent to the world of banking.” It’s not enough, though, and it’s not the ideal way to send the message. Continue reading

This week marked the five-year anniversary of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act being signed into law. The act is still not complete as parts of it are under review or yet to be written, but it is the biggest piece of consumer protection legislation to be passed since the legislation that was approved following the 1929 crash, including the US Banking Act of 1933 that contained the famous Glass-Steagall provisions. To commemorate this anniversary, Better Markets, a financial watchdog organization, assembled a report that details, among other things, the cost of the 2008 crisis. Continue reading